Sister Sara Goggin, a Sister of St. Mary of Oregon, cuts material and elastic for coronavirus masks in Beaverton, Ore., March 20, 2020. Search. , and also, to support any county-organized child care for frontline workers and teachers. Sew your own masks! Sew Sisters Quilt Shop. Women began digging through their fabric stashes and donated fabric. 5 yds of 1/4" (6 mm) Purple Elastic. Greenbelt Sisters Spearhead Homemade Mask Project. To cut your own filter insert for your Sisters in Circles mask, download and print this pattern. Sew Sisters Quilt Shop. This project has enabled Sew Loved to continue its mission to teach sewing, build self-confidence through new learned skills, train students for high-demand jobs, and directly employ students. DIY In our shared effort to fight against coronavirus, Sisters in Circles wants to share our pattern, instructions (including how we make our metal nose piece) and special techniques that we’ve figured out during our design process. They were taken before we started social distancing and were called to stay home. Katherine Dusseau, Manager of the Weber Shop, has been sewing for most of her life. They chose a pattern with a pocket for the filter and off they went. ... Each mask takes roughly 20 minutes to make, but some people sew faster than others. Greenbelt Sisters Spearhead Homemade Mask Project. Our Sew Loved Masks Project #SLMasks. Project Joy is a weekly column about the projects we’re doing at home that bring us a little piece of happiness. (Make and Sew Kindness) Project is an effort to change public behaviour around the usage of masks in times of COVID-19 crisis. The directions and results are the same, though. This is an initiative of the Global Shapers Bangalore Hub. Download and print this pattern to create the inner and outer parts of your mask. Note: I am using a using a basic sewing machine for this project, so my stitches may appear slightly different than yours if you are using a serger. Menu. The sisters are making hundreds of masks for Maryville, a nursing facility that is a short walk from the sisters' motherhouse. Kristen Hannum April 8, 2020. Our shop is temporarily closed for in store shopping due to Covid-19. The Sew Sisters responded. Sisters in Circles is a registered North Carolina Nonprofit with federal tax-exempt status application in process. An email was sent out with the pattern directions and Jean’s teaching video: youtu.be/HDSmyWX4PFs. Two sisters are taking strides to help medical officials fight this pandemic with a homemade mask system. In our shared effort to fight against coronavirus, Sisters in Circles wants to share our pattern, instructions (including how we make our metal nose piece) and special techniques that we’ve figured out during our design process. Regular price $12 96 $12.96. We are open for online and phone orders which can be mailed or picked up curbside. 2 talking about this. “I was feeling the need to help in some way with our current situation with COVID-19,” she said. Mask Nose Bars - 100 pieces. Thank you for signing up to receive our newsletters! Sew the other long side all the way from beginning to end with a zig zag stitch or serger. I was watching the progression in China and Italy in particular. The Sew Sisters Mask Project Written by Deborah The Austin Sew Sisters is a group of Christian women from various churches in Austin who enjoy quilting and fellowship through retreats, monthly sew days, service projects and ‘sew-alongs.’ Search. Having volunteers sew medical-grade material acquired by Project Protect into masks. At this time, they have made close to 400 masks. The lack of hygienic masks for the general public and single use mask production causes a severe public health and environmental effect. And due to the increase in cases throughout the nation, now it’s a reality. And they are still being sewn and delivered. Cart 0. Women sewed…and sewed…and sewed some more. Stay informed about Sisters in Circles and the work that we do. We are building up a pediatric mask inventory, for both students who may have priority to return to schools (younger, special ed, English learners, etc.) Although we are not able to teach in our normal program format, this opportunity has enabled us to pay overhead to keep Sew Loved alive, teach valuable skills and employ our trainees.