God is our mighty fortress, always ready to help in times of trouble. Otherwise dark, the stage is brightly lit. Reflections on Psalm 46 1 Reply Last week, I received an email from my dear friend Theresa, who mentioned that she had been working on Psalm 46, verse 10, “Be still and know that I am God.” I told her how special Psalm 46 was to me and, at Theresa’s urging, I agreed to blog on this psalm. Change ), You are commenting using your Twitter account. Therefore, as our God, Yahweh is our refuge and strength. Psalm 46 divides into two stanzas each followed by a refrain (vv 7, 11), celebrating God as the true ‘fortress’ of protection for his people. The contemporary context flows from the theological context. And there is a lot of fear going around. Last week, I received an email from my dear friend Theresa, who mentioned that she had been working on Psalm 46, verse 10, “Be still and know that I am God.” I told her how special Psalm 46 was to me and, at Theresa’s urging, I agreed to blog on this psalm. Reflections on Psalm 46 Final thoughts April 14, 2020 - J. Scott Duvall. As Christians, Psalm 46 helps us recall Jesus’ power over sin and death. Then, God will make the raging and violence in the earth stop, and He will be exalted among all the earth. This concludes then with verse 11 where the psalmist again praises God as the “LORD of hosts” and the “God of Jacob” who is “with us” as “our fortress.”. ( Log Out /  1 Reply. Psalm 46:10, is a popular verse for comforting ourselves and others—many people tend to think this verse means to rest or relax in who God is. A psalm of the sons of Korah, set to Alamoth. Editorial Note: It’s the middle of March 2020, and the coronavirus is beginning to hit the U.S. in a big way. Yet, the city of God where He dwells is secure and watered by gentle streams. 5                                       D. God is here. Robert Alden created a chiasm of Psalm 46 which pulls out some interesting features from its verses: 3-4                         C. God rules over natural calamaties. He is the leader of a great mighty host, able to conquer and do all that He wills. He is terrifying. Why so meaningful? But, there is a place that will not be moved. The psalm is bookended with these statements of God’s strength and nature as our refuge; i.e. And just like God’s challenge to Theresa, he commands us all to “be still”– a quiet reminder that our ultimate confidence and security is in the power and presence of God. Reflections on Psalm 46 for Reformation Sunday; 10/25/20; Pastor David Allman The superscription of the psalm says, “To the choirmaster. For us, under the new covenant established in Christ’s blood, the place of security is not a location but a Person. The superscription of the psalm says, “To the choirmaster. The sons of Korah were Levites who were commissioned by David to sing in the temple (cf. But we need to be reminded and comforted. Below are some excerpts from the sermon and his reflections on them. ( Log Out /  These sons of Korah were Levites, from the family of Kohath. Grace and peace. When the Reformation began, Martin Luther wrote that the one psalm that sustained him the most was Psalm 46. Like most psalms, Psalm 46 originated in the life of the Israelite community. Tag along to Capital University, a Lutheran college in Columbus, Ohio. By David’s time it seems they served in the musical aspect of the temple worship (2 Chronicles 20:19). I hope my reflections will encourage you and those you love. Let go of fear, burdens, sadness, and uncertainty. Let the earth tremble and the mountains tumble into the deepest sea. These thoughts are concluded in verse 7. Feel the Holy Spirit enfolding you in his love. Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com. Reflections on Psalm 46 By Aaron Simms on Saturday, November 16, 2013 I recently preached a short homily on Psalm 46. Psalm 46 has a number of parallelisms and images that focus the thoughts of the psalmist on Yahweh as a strong, secure refuge and the rest of the world as chaotic uncertainty. We have the river of life here and now in Baptism and will have it in full when Christ returns. The first few verses declare a sure and certain confidence and faith in the Lord, the next few speak of special situations and experiences before the Psalm ends with verses of complete assurance in the Divine intervention of the Lord on behalf of His people. “God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble” (verse 1). In the mean time, “Yahweh Sabaoth is with us, the God of Jacob is our fortress.”  He is both the almighty Lord God, but yet He is our God, the one who saves us and dwells with us. So, in the midst of a fallen, chaotic world, God is in control and is a refuge and fortress for His people. He invites us to enter, only to do so “quietly” since the university choir is rehearsing. Historical Context. It is significant that this parallelism refers to God as both “the LORD of hosts” and as the “God of Jacob.”  LORD of Hosts is Yahweh Sabaoth, and brings forward an image of God as the Almighty.