The book is masculine, and therefore so is the possessive adjective, no matter to whom the book belongs. Possessive adjectives are the words used in place of articles to indicate to whom or to what something belongs. Like all French adjectives, these agree with the noun they refer to. What is a possessive adjective? French Possessive Adjectives don’t take elision. You can't say "my hand" or "my hair." He's washing his hair (literally "He's washing the hair of himself"). It doesn't matter whether the owner of the house is male or female. Use. Here are the French possessive adjectives. A man would say mon livre when talking about a book, and a woman would also say mon livre. In this case, the possessive's final consonant is pronounced (the "n" in the example below) to achieve fluid pronunciation. They are considerably more complicated than English possessive adjectives because French has several different forms depending on the gender and number of the possessed noun. Possessive adjectives come before the noun they refer to. Possessive adjectives agree with what they describe, For more information on the difference between, The partitive article: du, de la, de l’ and des, Comparatives and superlatives of adjectives, Demonstrative adjectives: ce, cette, cet and ces, Using different types of pronoun together, Relative pronouns: qui, que, lequel, auquel, duquel, Demonstrative pronouns: ce, cela/ça, ceci, celui, The present tense: regular -er (first conjugation) verbs, The present tense: regular -ir (second conjugation) verbs, The present tense: regular -re (third conjugation) verbs, The present tense: spelling changes in -er verbs, Prepositions consisting of more than one word. A possessive pronoun can be used to replace it when it is used together with a noun in a sentence. In French grammar, there are three forms of the possessive for each singular person (I, you, he/she/it). We hope this guide was helpful in understanding the various parts of French Possessive Adjectives. Gratitude is the state of feeling grateful . When describing two or more nouns in French, a possessive adjective must be used in front of each one. For plural subjects (we, you, and they), French possessive adjectives are far simpler. When a feminine noun begins with a vowel, the masculine possessive adjective is used to avoid saying ma amie, which would break the flow of speech. ThoughtCo uses cookies to provide you with a great user experience. French possessive adjectives are used in similar ways to English possessive adjectives, but there are some differences in form. They have to correspond with the gender and number of the possessed noun. Get the latest news and gain access to exclusive updates and offers, Create an account and sign in to access this FREE content. All of the different forms are summarized in the table below and are explained in detail later in this lesson. If you need to stress the gender of the person the item belongs to, you can use à lui ("belonging to him") or à elle ("belonging to her"). French possessive adjectives are used in front of nouns to indicate to whom or to what those nouns belong. They agree with what they describe, rather than with the person who owns that thing. In English a possessive adjective is one of the words my, your, his, her, its, our or their used with a noun to show that one person or thing belongs to another.. The possessive adjective is almost never used with body parts in French. Above all, we hope you use this to practice more. French possessive adjectives are directly placed in front of the noun or adjective. Adjectifs possessifs. Like all French adjectives, these agree with the noun they refer to. I broke my leg (literally "I broke the leg of myself"). The gender, number, and first letter of the noun possessed determine which form to use. By using ThoughtCo, you accept our, How and When to Use French Possessive Pronouns, Understanding and Using French Adjectives (Adjectifs), French Demonstrative Adjectives: Adjectifs Démonstratifs, It's 'Ces Filles' in French, Not 'Cettes', Learn to Use the French Word 'Tout' and Its Variations, French Vocabulary Guide: Parts of the Body, Masculine and Feminine French Nouns ~ Noms, Plural French Subject Pronouns Nous Vous Ils Elles, French Love Language: L'Amour et l'Amitié, French Indirect Objects and Indirect Object Pronouns, The Many Meanings of the French Subject Pronoun On, French Comparative and Superlative Adverbs. There are only two forms for each grammatical person: singular and plural. Au revoir, until next chapter! This difference between English and French possessive adjectives can be particularly confusing when using him, her, or it. When a feminine noun begins with a vowel, the masculine possessive adjective is used: When a feminine noun begins with a vowel, the masculine possessive adjective is used: An important difference between French and English is that French utilizes the gender of the noun to determine which form to use, not the gender of the subject.