How it got to our shores is slightly vaguer: it’s reported that a visiting Briton grew fond of lokum and exported it back to the UK which is probably very close to the truth. It was then discovered by the Sultan who had it brought to his court. (Another tale has a Sultan’s chefs creating lokum so that he could court his mistresses with it.). In the Middle East it’s served with tea and coffee. No pretence was made at realism, as the meant-to-be-Arab couple were played by obviously white actors and the plot was slightly strange, but it was still jolly sexy. The service requires full JavaScript support in order to view this website. omg so accurate lol. Oh, and there’s a snake wiggling about as well. It has come to my attention that this product is fraud! That old 'Arabian sands' ad. Surprisingly, Mrs QTToBe, Fry's Turkish Delight chocolate is quite low in calories compared to many other confectinary bars, certainly far less than Mars bars os just simple CDM. Lokum is popular all over the world under very similar names (although in the Turkish part of Cyprus its moniker is ‘Cyprus Delight’) and can also be found in many different varieties, including with bergamot or mastic flavourings or infused with chopped pistachios, dates, hazelnuts or walnuts. Although how she would have eaten it without getting sand in every mouthful beats me. Sexy Eastern music plays over the top (although it appears to be played on the panpipes which aren’t a massively erotic instrument if I’m honest) and it ends with a sexy voiceover: ‘Fry’s Turkish Delight…Full of Eastern promise.’ So there you go: if you’re miserable in the desert you just need a sugar hit. Please enable JavaScript on your browser and try again. I've never been fond of Fry's - Marks and Spencer do a Turkish bar which has more of the rosy flavour I expect from this type of confectionery. Alt Ref No. The sweet that originates from that part of the world comes without a chocolate surround and has a softer, more delicate taste; it’s still a gel and starch based confectionery but without the added preservatives, colourings and artificial flavourings that are put into a product that needs to last on the shelves of a shop. Level: Item. peace and love (: To be frank, im utterly appaullled by this product. Fry’s Turkish Delight was first marketed in the UK in 1914, made by J.S. While Fry’s/Cadbury’s did – and still do - market their chocolate bar as Turkish Delight, it is not quite the same as the proper Turkish delight that you would find when visiting Turkey itself. www.hatads.org.uk is using a security service for protection against online attacks. Whether the legend of Bekir Effendi inventing lokum is true or not (and many historians believe it is not) his shop still stands in Istanbul and is still selling the sweet stuff. proper jelly inside, not like the runny goo cadbury's use. I can only eat one at a time though, and the thought of how many calories are in it is quite scary! Cadbury's Turkish Delight bars used to be nice, but a few years ago they committed the usual crime of changing the recipe (this was at the time they standardised all their filled chocolate bars, putting them all in similar wrappings), and they lost most of their flavour. It was launched in the UK in 1914 by the Bristol chocolate manufacturer J. S. Fry & Sons and consists of a rose-flavoured Turkish delight surrounded by milk chocolate. Coincidence one of my friends is the son of the model that was in the adverts. There are conflicting historical claims to the roots of Turkish delight: one story hails from 1776 where it’s said that a confectioner, Bekir Effendi, opened a shop in Istanbul where he experimented with a new sweet called ‘lokum’ (derived from the Arabic word ‘luqma’ meaning ‘morsel’). Almost as famous as the bar itself in this country is the most famous advertising campaign for it from the 1970s, which matched the Flake for all-round chocolatey sexiness. The service requires full cookie support in order to view this website. However it happened, years later J.S. Immediately recognisable from the metallic pink wrapping, it was – and still is – seen as a more ‘grown-up’ treat: not one that you’d buy with your pocket money on your way home from school, more the one your mum would have with her Sunday afternoon cup of tea that you’d beg a bite of. After getting this she cheers up, whilst he sits moodily on a sand dune. And as a child a bite is probably all you’d want of it; it was quite a sophisticated taste and while the jelly like sweet inside was fairly yummy, much more than that (plus the coating of milk chocolate) was definitely on the sickly side. The Fry's identity remained in use after Fry & Sons merged with Cadbury in 1919. This process is automatic. May 27, 2016 - Frys Turkish Delight - it was full of eastern promise! www.hatads.org.uk is using a security service for protection against online attacks. Extent: 1 commercial. :). : 1960s Frys Turkish Delight_Eastern promise_HAT2_1_15_27. I call upon all of you that love turkish delight to unite against this misleading product! The name gives the impression that the product is turkish, indeed it isnt. Glucose syrup, sugar, water, cocoa butter, cocoa mass, modified maize starch, dried skimmed milk, whey permeate powder (from milk ), gelling agent (pectin), palm oil, milk fat, colours (beetroot red, carotenes), emulsifier (E442), firming agent (E509), flavourings. Please enter your email to send a forgotten password. The advert 'Frys Turkish Delight....full of eastern promise' with the pan-piped music and the girl in the sand dunes is my earliest advert memory...I love that advert! Fry's Turkish Delight Commercial: [Eastern Promise] Information. I believe all us turkish delight lover need to unite against the false advertising! Ingredients. Sexy Eastern music plays over the top (although it appears to be played on the panpipes which aren’t a massively erotic instrument if I’m honest) and it ends with a sexy voiceover: ‘Fry’s Turkish Delight…Full of Eastern promise.’ So there you go: if you’re miserable in the desert you just need a sugar hit. His approval ensured that lokum became phenomenally successful. still love these. Sorry to hear that Baseman- may she rest in peace. Fry's Turkish Delight is a chocolate sweet made by Cadbury. You will be redirected once the validation is complete. Peace and love (: Discuss Fry's Turkish Delight on the message boards. A beautiful but sad woman lies waiting in the desert - we’re not entirely sure why she’s upset, but luckily her tears don’t spoil her incredibly well-maintained (for this particularly hot and sandy part of the world) make-up – until her white-clad hero arrives to give her some chocolate, which miraculously hasn’t melted and which he kindly chops up using his extremely lethal-looking sword. Although how she would have eaten it without getting sand in every mouthful beats me. So sweet and lovely was his new delicacy that word spread quickly and people flocked to his shop to buy it. The chocolate manufacturers were based in Bristol but in 1919, soon after the launch of their new and very different sweet they merged with Cadbury’s. Fry & Sons came up with the novel idea of creating its own version and then covering it with chocolate, before Cadbury’s continued the practice when it absorbed the smaller company (Cadbury’s continues to sell it 100 years later, as well as its own variety, Dairy Milk Turkish). A lady takes Turkish Delight from a box of jewellery/treasure and takes it outside to the horse rider. www.hatads.org.uk is using a security service for protection against online attacks. Fry & Sons. I am so glad you can still get these,I bought one last week.Yummy. Pure Turkish delight is created by very slowly boiling sugar syrup and cornflour over a low heat (gelatine can be used to make the process a lot quicker but without this it can be a foodstuff for vegetarians and vegans); the resulting jelly is then flavoured with an essence – usually rosewater or citrus, but occasionally a peppermint or cinnamon oil is used – before being allowed to set, cut into cubes and dusted with a lot of icing sugar. It’s the chocolate bar that has always seemed a little bit more exotic than the others. I love Turkish Delight - they have changed the recipe slightly but it's still yummy! Please enable cookies on your browser and try again. Reference; HAT2/1/15/27; Description: A man rides his horse towards a town. Thankfully the name ‘Turkish Delight’ took off in England as apparently at one stage it used to be known as ‘Lumps of Delight’ which quite frankly doesn’t make me think of confectionery…, "the one your mum would have with her Sunday afternoon cup of tea that you’d beg a bite of."